Introduction To Miranda July

Introduction To Miranda July

I was first introduced to Miranda July in the first year at university, and that introduction started with Learning To Love You More, an interactive piece where people were asked to submit assignments created with Harrell Fletcher. If you've never heard of the project, sadly it closed in 2009, but the archive of submissions is available online.

And it's absolutely beautiful.

Often I find myself perusing the site (or the book, which I also own). There are over seventy assignments that a multitude of people completed, from taking flash photographs under their bed, braiding someones hair, making a paper replica of their bed, photographing a scar and writing about it (which I used as basis for a piece of work I did where-in I photographed peoples scars/bruises/birthmarks and then wrote fictional stories to accompany them).

Of my favourite assignments is number 35, Ask your family to describe what you do. There is a wealth of information in those that took part in this assignment and it always makes me wonder what other people think I do. (If you want to let me know, email/tweet me and I'll post all the answers anonymously next month).

Miranda July has also published books, my favourite has to be No One Belongs Here More Than You. The collection of stories has always touched me and helped me feel less alone in my dark moments.

Also worth noting is the Somebody app (for iOS only). The app sent your message not to your friend, but the person using somebody closest to your friend. Sadly, Somebody was stopped in October of last year, but again, there is an archive of participants experiences using the app here.

Although an artist, personally I find Miranda July more than that. Her artworks are about bringing people together, about helping us not feel so alone. It's about sharing and caring and seeing that the distance between you and I is easily crossable.

#The 100 Day Project - The Beginning

#The 100 Day Project - The Beginning

The Case for Teaching Art in Schools

The Case for Teaching Art in Schools